A Picture of Clouds

Cloud Facts for Kids

This web page contains cloud facts for kids and is a great resource for anyone of any age researching clouds. Our goal is to provide you with the latest and most accurate cloud facts from scientific sources. In addition to cool facts, you'll find some cool cloud pictures and additional resources for researching clouds.

The cloud facts listed below with help you learn what a cloud is, the different types of clouds, how a cloud forms, the different types of altitudes you’ll find certain types of clouds and other cloud facts. We hope these facts about clouds are helpful and help you learn more about this fascinating metrological event.

If any of the below cloud facts are inaccurate, please contact us and let us know.


20 Cloud Facts for Kids

  1. A cloud is a meteorological term used to describe a visible collection of tiny water droplets, ice crystals and other particles suspended in the Earth’s upper atmosphere.
  2. In meteorology, the study of clouds is called nephology and a person who studies clouds is called a nephrologist.
  3. Clouds form when warm air rises and cools down in the atmosphere. As the warm air cools, the water vapor in it turns into tiny water droplets or ice crystals. These tiny water droplets and/or ice crystals eventually form a cloud.
  4. Clouds produce precipitation, like rain, snow, hail and sleet.
  5. Clouds can hold millions of gallons of water.
  6. Clouds can travel at more than 100 mph (160 km/h) with the jet stream.
  7. There are 10 common types of clouds you might see in the sky. They are altocumulus, altocumulus, circus, cirrocumulus, cirrostratus, cumulonimbus, cumulus, nimbostratus, stratocumulus and stratus.
  8. Altocumulus clouds are found at an altitude of 6,500 to 20,000 feet (1981 to 6,100 meters)
  9. Circus clouds are found at an altitude of 16,500 to 45,000 feet (5,029 to 13,716 meters).
  10. Cirrocumulus clouds are found at an altitude of 20,000 to 40,000 feet (6,100 to 12,192 meters).
  11. Cirrostratus clouds are found at an altitude of 18,000 to 42,000 feet (5,486 to 12,801 meters).
  12. Cirrostratus clouds are what cause a halo you see around the sun.
  13. Cumulus clouds are found at an altitude of less than 2,000 feet (610 meters).
  14. Cumulus clouds are typically what kids and adults use for cloud spotting, also known as cloud watching. Their cotton like appearance and depth makes them appear like all sorts of objects.
  15. Cumulonimbus clouds are found at an altitude of 1,500 to 40,000 feet (458 to 12,192 meters).
  16. Cumulonimbus clouds can produce severe weather, such as hail, heavy rain, lightning, thunder and tornadoes.
  17. Nimbostratus clouds are found at an altitude of less than 10,000 feet (3,048 meters).
  18. Stratocumulus clouds are found at an altitude of less than 6,500 feet (1,081 meters).
  19. Stratus clouds are found at an altitude of less than 6,000 feet (1,829 meters).
  20. Stratus clouds are sometimes responsible for producing fog like conditions when they get close to the ground.

Additional Resources for Cloud Research