Planet Facts for Kids

Planet Facts for Kids

Welcome to our Planet Facts library. On this page you can access one of the largest collections of facts about the planets on the internet. This is the perfect resource for students, teachers or anyone who wants to learn about all the planets in our solar system. We hope you find these facts about planets interesting, mind-blowing and educational. You can begin to explore our planet facts library by scrolling down and choosing a section.

Our Planet Facts category is separated into different sections. Each section is about a specific planet in our solar system. For example, we have a section about the planet Earth, Mercury and Venus. We're constantly updating our planet facts, if you can't find the information you're looking for you should check back at a later date. You can also contact us with your requests, and we'll add it to one of our future updates.

Each of the currently available planet facts sections are listed below, in order from closest to farthest from the sun.

Planet Mercury Facts for Kids

Mercury Facts

In this section you'll learn about the planet Mercury. You'll learn how far the Mercury is from the sun, how big Mercury is, how long ago Mercury formed and other facts about the planet Mercury.

Mercury Facts

Planet Venus Facts for Kids

Venus Facts

In this section you'll learn about the planet Venus. You'll learn how far the Venus is from the sun, how big Venus is, how long ago Venus formed and other facts about the planet Venus.

Venus Facts

Planet Earth Facts for Kids

Earth Facts

In this section you'll learn about the planet Earth. You'll learn how far the Earth is from the sun, what moons orbit Earth, how big Earth is, how long ago Earth formed and other facts about the planet Earth.

Earth Facts

Planet Mars Facts for Kids

Mars Facts

In this section you'll learn about the planet Mars. You'll learn how far the Mars is from the sun, how big Mars is, how long ago Mars formed and other facts about the planet Mars.

Mars Facts

Planet Jupiter Facts for Kids

Jupiter Facts

In this section you'll learn about the planet Jupiter. You'll learn how far the Jupiter is from the sun, how big Jupiter is, how long ago Jupiter formed and other facts about the planet Jupiter.

Jupiter Facts

Planet Saturn Facts for Kids

Saturn Facts

In this section you'll learn about the planet Saturn. You'll learn how far the Saturn is from the sun, what moons orbit Saturn, how big Saturn is, how long ago Saturn formed and other facts about the planet Saturn.

Saturn Facts

Planet Uranus  Facts for Kids

Uranus Facts

In this section you'll learn about the planet Uranus . You'll learn how far the Uranus is from the sun, how big Uranus is, how long ago Uranus formed and other facts about the planet Uranus .

Uranus Facts

Planet Neptune Facts for Kids

Neptune Facts

In this section you'll learn about the planet Neptune. You'll learn how far the Neptune is from the sun, how big Neptune is, how long ago Neptune formed and other facts about the planet Neptune.

Neptune Facts

Dwarf Planet Pluto Facts for Kids

Pluto Facts

In this section you'll learn about Pluto. Even though the IAU reclassified Pluto in 2006, it holds a place in our heart. Learn about Pluto's history, how big it is and other facts about the dwarf planet Pluto.

Pluto Facts

Our solar system formed about 4.6 billion years ago. There are currently eight known planets in our solar system. These planets are Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. There are 185 known moons (natural satellites) orbiting these planets. Jupiter has the most with 79 moons, and Earth has the least with one moon, Mercury and Venus have no known moons.

All eight planets orbit the sun. The sun is a main-sequence star in the center of our solar system. All planets orbit the sun in a counterclockwise direction when viewed from the north pole of our sun. The shortest orbital period is Mercury, it only takes about 88 Earth days to fully orbit the sun. The longest orbital period is Neptune. It takes over 164 Earth years to completely orbit the sun.

Between 1930 and 2006, Pluto was considered the ninth planet, but the International Astronomical Union in 2006 formally defined the term planet, effectively demoting Pluto to a dwarf planet.