A Picture of the Human Gallbladder

Gallbladder Facts for Kids

  • Organ Name: Gallbladder
  • Organ Location: Upper right abdomen
  • Organ System: Digestive system
  • Organ Purpose: Storage of bile for small intestines
  • Organ Length: Between 2.9 and 3.9 inches
  • Organ Capacity: About 1.8 fluid ounces

17 Gallbladder Facts for Kids

  1. The gallbladder is a pear-shaped organ that is located beneath the liver.
  2. The gallbladder is part of the human digestive system.
  3. The gallbladder stores bile that is received from the liver and releases it into the small intestines.
  4. The bile stored and released by the gallbladder helps digest fats.
  5. The bile that is released into the small intestines is far more concentrated than when it enters the gallbladder. The gallbladder will remove electrolytes and water from the bile while it’s stored.
  6. The gallbladder in a human is in the upper right abdomen, underneath the live.
  7. The shape and size of the gallbladder can vary between people.
  8. In rare instances, a person can have two or three gallbladders.
  9. In 2013, it’s estimated that over 100,000 deaths were due to gallbladder and biliary related diseases.
  10. A gallstone is a calculus (stone) that forms in the gallbladder from components in bile.
  11. About 80% of all people who have gallstones have no symptoms, but some may feel cramp-like pain.
  12. The surgical procedure to remove a gallstone is called a cholecystolithotomy.
  13. A human can have their gallbladder removed and live a normal healthy life.
  14. The surgical procedure to remove the gallbladder is called a cholecystectomy.
  15. The first successful surgical procedure to remove the gallbladder was performed by German surgeon Carl Langenbuch on July 15th, 1882 at a hospital in Berlin, Germany.
  16. According to the Guinness World Records, an unnamed 85-year-old woman holds the records for the gallstones removed at one time, which was 23,530 in 1987.
  17. There are some historians who think Alexander the Great’s death was associated with cholecystitis, which is an inflammation of the gallbladder.

Additional Resources About the Human Gallbladder